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Agenda 2024

The Digital Summit addresses some of the biggest challenges facing public sector heads of digital around the world

October 21st

All times provided are local (Ottawa, EST)

Monday October 21st

18:00 – 19:00

Reception

Co-hosted by the Government of Canada and Global Government Forum

Monday October 21st

19:00 – 19:30

Welcome and introductions

Stephen Burt, Chief Data Officer of Canada

 

Monday October 21st

19:30 – 21:30

 

How to realise true digital transformation in government

Governments around the exploring the use of artificial intelligence programs to help improve their services and deliver more effectively for users. For example, researchers have found that the Canadian federal government has used artificial intelligence in nearly 300 projects and initiatives, while the UK’s National Audit Office has said that 74 AI use cases have been deployed in the UK government. 

In order to make the most of the use of AI, it is important that governments analyze what works – and what doesn’t. This session will share insight from digital leaders around the world on where AI is being most effectively used in government, where there is unexamined potential, and where it’s use has not been effective. 

Presentations, followed by group discussion

Tuesday October 22nd

All times provided are local (Ottawa, EST)

Tuesday October 22nd

09:00 – 10:30

Is artificial intelligence working for government?

Building robust digital credential and log in systems that cross organisations – and even sectors – is one way that governments around the world are working to be able to join up data to provide services more focused on citizens and built around key life milestones. 

However, the development of such systems – as well as digital ID systems – has been fraught in many countries at a time when misinformation and conspiracy theories can spread at speed online. This session will discuss the potential of single sign on systems in government, as well as sharing reflections from public servants on how such systems can be developed and deployed in a way that leads to increases in both public trust and government transparency. 

Including presentations and discussion

Session followed by refreshment break

Tuesday October 22nd

11:00 – 12:30

Sign in of the times: how government can get digital credentials right 

Governments around the world have developed strategies to make use of cloud computing to host and process government data. Such an approach can have advantages for government, by making it easier for departments and agencies to access the information they hold and analyse it to provide insight on driving better delivery.

However, some administrations have moved from a cloud-first approach to a cloud-smart policy, in order to make sure that its use is effective in providing rapid, secure, and stable access to digital services.

The cloud smart approach is intended to help ensure government can use the right mix of technology, while solving some of the issues around cloud deployment. This session will share insight on developing best practice on cloud computing in government, as well as how governments can manage the procurement, costs and ongoing deployment of cloud technology.

Including presentations and discussion

Session followed by networking lunch

Tuesday October 22nd

13:45 – 15:15

Challenges – and solutions – to getting cloud right in government

Public servants around the world agree that better sharing of data – both within and across organizations – is vital to delivering better services. However, despite many policies that seek to improve the sharing of information, governments often struggle to make it happen in a way that can inform policy and delivery. 

The Canadian government, for example, has set an expectation that federal organizations should work to identify the specific barriers that are limiting the ability to share data, as well as implementing common data standards across government. 

This session will discuss why the challenges that government faces in making data-sharing happen are so difficult to overcome. This session will discuss how to establish a data model across government that provide the technology, standards, culture and legislative building blocks to better data sharing. 

Including presentations and discussion

Session followed by refreshment break

Tuesday October 22nd

15:30 – 17:00

Why is data sharing so hard in government?

Public servants around the world agree that better sharing of data – both within and across organizations – is vital to delivering better services. However, despite many policies that seek to improve the sharing of information, governments often struggle to make it happen in a way that can inform policy and delivery. 

The Canadian government, for example, has set an expectation that federal organizations should work to identify the specific barriers that are limiting the ability to share data, as well as implementing common data standards across government. 

This session will discuss why the challenges that government faces in making data-sharing happen are so difficult to overcome. This session will discuss how to establish a data model across government that provide the technology, standards, culture and legislative building blocks to better data sharing. 

Including presentations and discussion

Tuesday October 22nd

17:00-17:20

Summary and thanks

Summit concludes 17:20